New America is dedicated to the renewal of American politics, prosperity, and purpose in the digital age through big ideas, technological innovation, next generation politics, and creative engagement with broad audiences.

Local Journalism in the Digital Age

The New Measures Research Project at Rutgers University has launched a unique approach to identifying the health of local news ecosystems and locating areas of staggering information inequality.

Upcoming Events

Contested Terrain: The Future of Afghan Women

EVENT May 28, 2015 12:15 PM– 01:45 PM

Thursday May 28, 2015

12:15 PM – 01:45 PM


[u'1899 L Street NW, Suite 400', u'Washington, DC 20036']

With the U.S. withdrawing from Afghanistan and a new Afghan government having assumed power, where does the future of Afghan women lie? In her new book, "Contested Terrain: Reflections with Afghan Women Leaders," Sally L. Kitch explores the crisis in contemporary Afghan women's lives by focusing on the stories of Judge Marzia Basel and Ms. Jamila Afghani from 2005 through 2014, providing an oft-ignored perspective on the personal and professional lives of Afghanistan's women.

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GEEK HERESY

EVENT June 04, 2015 12:15 PM– 01:45 PM

Thursday June 04, 2015

12:15 PM – 01:45 PM


[u'1899 L Street NW', u'Suite 400', u'Washington, DC 20036']

Popular wisdom holds that technology can help the developing world make great strides, whether it’s by facilitating education, helping with access to water, or delivering much-needed medication. But Kentaro Toyama, W. K. Kellogg Associate Professor at the University of Michigan’s School of Information and co-founder of Microsoft Research India, argues in a new book that believing technology is the key to fixing these problems is wrong-headed, and can have damaging results.

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RESOLVED: TECHNOLOGY WILL TAKE ALL OUR JOBS

EVENT June 04, 2015 06:30 PM– 08:00 PM

Thursday June 04, 2015

06:30 PM – 08:00 PM


[u'1834 Connecticut Avenue NW', u'Washington, DC 20005']

Policy wonks and journalists in Washington like to fret about otherwise desirable technological progress subtracting millions of manufacturing and entry-level service sector jobs from the overall economy. It hasn't been their own jobs, mind you, that they typically consider to be threatened by automation. Surely no amount of computing power can write policy papers or newspaper columns, negotiate with Iran, oversee constituent services in a congressional office or, um, convene a debate at a think tank. Or can it? Will the advent of truly nuanced, intuitive artificial intelligence render the vast majority of workers in all segments of the economy redundant? What would that mean for former think tank debate-conveners? A glorious age of leisure with bountiful productivity gains for all, or a Great Depression for all but a very few? Or are all such questions just another tiresome bout of excessive hype (and Luddite angst) around technology that will invariably prove overblown?

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in the news | May 21, 2015 | Breadwinning & Caregiving

Playing the Granny Card

Think about how this might apply to Hillary Clinton, long seen as competent but not warm—hence her famous “likability” deficit. Of course, there are reasons unrelated to gender why this might be: many voters question her truthfulness about incidents ranging from Whitewater to the fiasco involving her State Department e-mails. (It is worth pausing to note that female politicians aren’t by definition more virtuous than male ones, and that aging doesn’t necessarily change a person’s character for better or worse. Indeed, one could argue that, in an odd sense, women will have truly arrived when grandmotherly politicians reveal themselves to be just as scandal-prone as older men are.)

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