New America is dedicated to the renewal of American politics, prosperity, and purpose in the digital age through big ideas, technological innovation, next generation politics, and creative engagement with broad audiences.

Deciding to go to college

Today, New America’s Education Policy Program released the first in a series of College Decisions Survey briefs that analyze new survey data about what prospective college students know about the college-going and financing process. Part 1: Deciding to Go to College focuses on why students decide to pursue college in the first place, and looks at how financial concerns are one of the major drivers in deciding whether and where to go to college.

Upcoming Events

Connecting Talent with Opportunity in the Digital Age

EVENT June 04, 2015 09:00 AM– 11:00 AM

Thursday June 04, 2015

09:00 AM – 11:00 AM


[u'1899 L Street NW, Suite 400', u'Washington, DC, 20036']

This event will bring together industry experts, economists, business leaders, and policy makers to discuss how these technologies might address stubborn disconnects in labor markets around the world---and what it will take to capture their potential.

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GEEK HERESY

EVENT June 04, 2015 12:15 PM– 01:45 PM

Thursday June 04, 2015

12:15 PM – 01:45 PM


[u'1899 L Street NW', u'Suite 400', u'Washington, DC 20036']

Popular wisdom holds that technology can help the developing world make great strides, whether it’s by facilitating education, helping with access to water, or delivering much-needed medication. But Kentaro Toyama, W. K. Kellogg Associate Professor at the University of Michigan’s School of Information and co-founder of Microsoft Research India, argues in a new book that believing technology is the key to fixing these problems is wrong-headed, and can have damaging results.

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RESOLVED: TECHNOLOGY WILL TAKE ALL OUR JOBS

EVENT June 04, 2015 06:30 PM– 08:00 PM

Thursday June 04, 2015

06:30 PM – 08:00 PM


[u'1834 Connecticut Avenue NW', u'Washington, DC 20005']

Policy wonks and journalists in Washington like to fret about otherwise desirable technological progress subtracting millions of manufacturing and entry-level service sector jobs from the overall economy. It hasn't been their own jobs, mind you, that they typically consider to be threatened by automation. Surely no amount of computing power can write policy papers or newspaper columns, negotiate with Iran, oversee constituent services in a congressional office or, um, convene a debate at a think tank. Or can it? Will the advent of truly nuanced, intuitive artificial intelligence render the vast majority of workers in all segments of the economy redundant? What would that mean for former think tank debate-conveners? A glorious age of leisure with bountiful productivity gains for all, or a Great Depression for all but a very few? Or are all such questions just another tiresome bout of excessive hype (and Luddite angst) around technology that will invariably prove overblown?

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policy paper | May 28, 2015 | Education Policy
Deciding to go to college

Deciding to go to college

2015 College Decisions Survey: Part I

Today, New America’s Education Policy Program released the first in a series of College Decisions Survey briefs that analyze new survey data about what prospective college students know about the college-going and financing process. Part 1: Deciding to Go to College focuses on why students decide to pursue college in the first place, and looks at how financial concerns are one of the major drivers in deciding whether and where to go to college.

Recent Content