New America is dedicated to the renewal of American politics, prosperity, and purpose in the digital age through big ideas, technological innovation, next generation politics, and creative engagement with broad audiences.

Contested Terrain: The Future of Afghan Women

With the U.S. military withdrawing and a new government in place, how will women be affected by Afghanistan's moment of transition? Join New America and the McCain Institute for International Leadership for a conversation about the obstacles and opportunities currently facing Afghan women.

Upcoming Events

Contested Terrain: The Future of Afghan Women

EVENT May 28, 2015 12:15 PM– 01:45 PM

Thursday May 28, 2015

12:15 PM – 01:45 PM


[u'1899 L Street NW, Suite 400', u'Washington, DC 20036']

With the U.S. military withdrawing and a new government in place, how will women be affected by Afghanistan's moment of transition? Join New America and the McCain Institute for International Leadership for a conversation about the obstacles and opportunities currently facing Afghan women.

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GEEK HERESY

EVENT June 04, 2015 12:15 PM– 01:45 PM

Thursday June 04, 2015

12:15 PM – 01:45 PM


[u'1899 L Street NW', u'Suite 400', u'Washington, DC 20036']

Popular wisdom holds that technology can help the developing world make great strides, whether it’s by facilitating education, helping with access to water, or delivering much-needed medication. But Kentaro Toyama, W. K. Kellogg Associate Professor at the University of Michigan’s School of Information and co-founder of Microsoft Research India, argues in a new book that believing technology is the key to fixing these problems is wrong-headed, and can have damaging results.

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RESOLVED: TECHNOLOGY WILL TAKE ALL OUR JOBS

EVENT June 04, 2015 06:30 PM– 08:00 PM

Thursday June 04, 2015

06:30 PM – 08:00 PM


[u'1834 Connecticut Avenue NW', u'Washington, DC 20005']

Policy wonks and journalists in Washington like to fret about otherwise desirable technological progress subtracting millions of manufacturing and entry-level service sector jobs from the overall economy. It hasn't been their own jobs, mind you, that they typically consider to be threatened by automation. Surely no amount of computing power can write policy papers or newspaper columns, negotiate with Iran, oversee constituent services in a congressional office or, um, convene a debate at a think tank. Or can it? Will the advent of truly nuanced, intuitive artificial intelligence render the vast majority of workers in all segments of the economy redundant? What would that mean for former think tank debate-conveners? A glorious age of leisure with bountiful productivity gains for all, or a Great Depression for all but a very few? Or are all such questions just another tiresome bout of excessive hype (and Luddite angst) around technology that will invariably prove overblown?

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Books

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Recent Content

press release | May 25, 2015 | Open Technology Institute
People-Powered Networks

People-Powered Networks

WindFarm.0: An Experiment in Off-the-Grid Communications

Despite the small computers in many of our pockets, when the Internet goes down or when there is no Internet infrastructure, it is surprisingly difficult to communicate digitally. We are tied to our centralized communication systems.

On May 15th and 16th, the Guardian Project convened a group to discuss new ...

Recent Content

press release | May 23, 2015 | Open Technology Institute

Surveillance Hawks in Senate Block USA FREEDOM Act Surveillance Reform Bill

Vote Against Reform Is Ironically Likely to Lead to Expiration of Key Spying Powers

Washington, DC — Shortly after midnight this morning, Senators intent on preserving the NSA’s ability to spy on millions of innocent Americans blocked movement of the USA FREEDOM Act (H.R. 2048), the same surveillance reform bill that the House passed last week by an overwhelming vote of 338 to 88. The bill failed on a procedural vote of 57 yeas to 42 nays, falling short of the sixty votes necessary for it to proceed. However, the pro-surveillance bloc in the stalemated Senate also failed to move forward with its own bill to renew for two months USA PATRIOT Act Section 215, the law that is being used to justify the NSA’s bulk collection of phone records and that is set to expire or “sunset” at midnight the morning of June 1. That bill also failed on a procedural vote, 45 yeas to 54 nays. The Senate now plans to reconvene on May 31 to reconsider the issue one more time before the June 1 deadline.

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in the news | May 23, 2015 | Education Policy

Arizona State University’s Radical New Freshman Year Comes At A Cost

Rachel Fishman, a senior policy analyst at the New America Foundation, said the structure of current federal regulations likely bars students from receiving federal aid for programs like the Freshman Academy. “Existing rules and regulations clearly state that federal financial aid cannot be used to pay for evaluating prior student work,” she wrote in a blog post.

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in the news | May 21, 2015 | Future of War

Australian Defence Force 20 years behind US in preparing for drone-based warfare, expert says

Peter W Singer, a strategist at the New America Foundation and former senior fellow at the Brookings Institute in Washington, said 80 different countries already equipped their militaries with drones, plus they were being used by non-state actors like Islamic State, paparazzi and farmers. He said the human role in controlling drones was also changing. "They can do things like take off and land on their own, fly mission waypoints on their own, ID targets on their own," he said.

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in the news | May 21, 2015 | Future of War International Security

Dr. Strange-oil

Pressure caused by cratering oil prices may make Putin act in ways that the West may not expect. Around half of the Russian government’s revenue comes from the oil and natural gas economy. The Russian 2015-2017 draft budget is based on a $100-per-barrel price for a $400 billion-per-year budget. But oil has been trading between $45 and $65 for the last several months, and some believe it could dip into the mid-$20 range. Meanwhile, the ruble lost half its value against the dollar in 2014, and inflation in Russia has ballooned to 17 percent. The economy is projected to precipitously shrink by 3 to 8 percent in 2015.