Current Class

Class of 2018 New America National Fellows
Greg Barker

Greg Barker

ASU Future of War Fellow

Greg Barker, ASU Future of War Fellow, will release the feature documentary The Final Year, a sweeping insiders’ account of President Barack Obama’s foreign policy team during their last year in office. Barker recently directed Legion of Brothers for CNN Films, which premiered at the Sundance Film Festival and tells the story of Green Berets sent on secret missions into Afghanistan to overthrow the Taliban immediately following 9/11. Described by the New York Times as “a filmmaker of artistic and political consequence,” Barker looks for strong personal narratives that illuminate the complexities and moral ambiguities of global politics and war.  His previous films include HBO’s Manhunt, about the hunt for Osama bin Laden, which won the PrimeTime Emmy® for Outstanding Documentary Special, Homegrown: The Counter-Terror Dilemma, as well as Sergio (Sundance award-winner), Koran by Heart, and numerous films for PBS/Frontline, including the acclaimed Ghosts of Rwanda.

Reginald Dwayne Betts

Reginald Dwayne Betts

Emerson Fellow

Reginald Dwayne Betts, Emerson Fellow, will work on a book that examines the criminal justice system through his experience as a formerly incarcerated person working as a public defender. He is the author of three books, including the 2015 collection of poems Bastards of the Reagan Era. A graduate of the Yale Law School, Betts has received fellowships from the Soros Foundation, the Poetry Foundation, and the Radcliffe Institute of Advanced Studies. In 2012, Betts was named a member of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention by former President Obama.

Nonny de la Pena

Nonny de la Peña

New Arizona Fellow

Nonny de la Peña, New Arizona Fellow, will work on a virtual reality story that puts the audience on the U.S.-Mexico border. She is founder and CEO of Emblematic Group where she has produced groundbreaking and award winning VR content, including Hunger in Los Angeles, the first VR piece ever shown at Sundance. Her other work includes After Solitary and Greenland Melting (in partnership with PBS Frontline), We Who Remain (in partnership with the New York Times), Out Of Exile (in partnership with Sarah Ramirez' Atrevida Productions), among many others. She has received the Knight Foundation Award for Media Innovation and was named a Yale Poynter Fellow.

Katie Engelhart

Katie Engelhart

Eric & Wendy Schmidt Fellow

Katie Engelhart, Eric & Wendy Schmidt Fellow, will work on a book about the “right to die”. She is a reporter/producer at NBC News and NBC Left Field, working on documentary news films. Previously, she was a London-based correspondent for VICE News and a Europe correspondent for Maclean's Magazine. Her writing has appeared in the New York Times, the Guardian and Foreign Policy, among other publications, and she is the recipient of awards including the Canada National Magazine Award. Engelhart holds a master’s of philosophy from St. Antony's College, Oxford University, and a B.A. from Cornell University.

Joshua Geltzer

Joshua Geltzer

ASU Future of War Fellow

Joshua Geltzer, ASU Future of War Fellow, is writing a book exploring challenges associated with modern communications technologies such as social media platforms, file-upload sites, and internet search engines. He is the executive director and visiting professor of law at Georgetown University Law Center's Institute for Constitutional Advocacy and Protection. He served from 2015 to 2017 as senior director for counterterrorism at the National Security Council staff, having served previously as deputy legal advisor to the National Security Council and as counsel to the Assistant Attorney General for National Security at the Department of Justice. He is the author of US Counter-Terrorism Strategy and al-Qaeda: Signalling and the Terrorist World-View, published by Routledge; and his work has appeared in Parameters, Studies in Conflict & Terrorism, the Journal of Constitutional Law, and the Berkeley Journal of International Law.

Sara Hendren

Sara Hendren

Eric & Wendy Schmidt Fellow

Sara Hendren, Eric & Wendy Schmidt Fellow, will work on a book about the unexpected places where disability is at the heart of design, to be published by Riverhead in 2019. Examining the origins and evolution of products, architecture, city planning, and beyond, Hendren will report on the always-adaptive human body where it meets the built environment and our collective global stakes in an inclusively designed future. Hendren is a designer- and researcher-in-residence at Olin College where she runs the Adaptation + Ability group, a lab for creative technology and the body; she also teaches human-centered design and disability studies for engineering students. Her work, which includes artifacts, graphics, and social design projects, has been exhibited in museums and galleries in the United States and abroad and is held in the permanent collection at MoMA (NYC). In 2017, she is the recipient of a Public Scholar grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Didi Kuo

Didi Kuo

Eric & Wendy Schmidt Fellow

Didi Kuo, Eric & Wendy Schmidt Fellow, will write a book on the collapse of political parties across Western democracies and its implications for democratic reform. She manages the Program on American Democracy in Comparative Perspective at Stanford University's Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law. Her first book, Clientelism, Capitalism, and Democracy, is forthcoming from Cambridge University Press. She holds a BA from Emory University, an MSc in economic history from Oxford University, where she studied as a Marshall Scholar, and a PhD in political science from Harvard University.

Emma LeBlanc

Emma Findlen LeBlanc

Eric & Wendy Schmidt Fellow

Emma Findlen LeBlanc, Eric & Wendy Schmidt Fellow, will make a documentary film about Iraq war veterans, in collaboration with co-Fellow Taylor Lee Nagel. LeBlanc is a senior researcher at the American Civil Liberties Union of Maine and a Rhodes Scholar at the University of Oxford, where she is completing her DPhil in social anthropology. Previously, she worked as a journalist in Syria and Iraq for publications including GQ, Slate, Le Monde, the New York Times Globalization and Human Rights blog, and the National, and she has exhibited her photographs in the United States, United Kingdom, and Middle East. Her first short film, There Are No Brothers Here, about a young Syrian protester and a secret police interrogator, is currently screening in film festivals.

LeBlanc and Nagel’s project—A Normal Soldier—follows a group of soldiers deployed to Iraq’s “Triangle of Death” in 2007 and 2008. The film tracks these soldiers ten years later, back at home, as they move through their daily routines, while also narrating the events of their deployment. The film explores the challenges of reconciliation that these soldiers face: the reconciliation of Iraq and America, war and peace, the past and the present, the roles of soldier and civilian, and their two worlds governed by often contradictory values and rules. Through these parallel narratives A Normal Soldier offers a reflection on the Iraq war and America’s relationship with the war, its soldiers, and veterans.
Larissa MacFarquhar

Larissa MacFarquhar

Emerson Fellow

Larissa MacFarquhar, Emerson Fellow, is writing a book about the decision to stay, leave, or return to a hometown, how that can affect a person’s worldview, and how countless such decisions shift America’s politics. Her previous book, Strangers Drowning: Impossible Idealism, Drastic Choices, and the Urge to Help, told the stories of people with an extreme sense of ethical duty, and traced a history of attitudes towards them. Since 1998 she has been a staff writer at the New Yorker magazine, where she has written recently about the Bronx Family Court and Trump voters in West Virginia. Her profile subjects have included philosopher Derek Parfit, candidate Barack Obama, and poet John Ashbery.

Azadeh Moaveni

Azadeh Moaveni

ASU Future of War Fellow

Azadeh Moaveni, ASU Future of War Fellow, will write a book about women and ISIS, exploring why the group’s brand of jihadism has appealed so powerfully to women in both the West and the Middle East, and how women’s involvement propelled its rapid rise and success. She will look at how the world of transnational jihadist groups connects to the challenges of social policy and governance in America, Europe, and the Middle East. She is the author of Lipstick Jihad, Honeymoon in Tehran, and Iran Awakening, together with Nobel Laureate Shirin Ebadi. As a correspondent for TIME and the Los Angeles Times, she reported from across the Middle East for over a decade. Her writing appears in the New York Times, the New Yorker, the Financial Times, and other publications. She is currently senior lecturer in journalism at Kingston University, London.

Taylor Nagel

Taylor Lee Nagel

Eric & Wendy Schmidt Fellow

Taylor Lee Nagel, Eric & Wendy Schmidt Fellow, is a film director and producer. Along with co-Fellow Emma Findlen LeBlanc, she will spend her fellowship year making a documentary about Iraq war veterans. Previous documentary projects include a series about a Mexican immigrant’s journey across America, as well as a feature-length documentary about the Strangers Project, a traveling storytelling exhibition. Nagel has also produced independent narrative films that have screened at festivals in the United States and internationally. She has a B.A. in political science from Barnard College.

Nagel and LeBlanc's project—A Normal Soldier—follows a group of soldiers deployed to Iraq’s “Triangle of Death” in 2007 and 2008. The film tracks these soldiers ten years later, back at home, as they move through their daily routines, while also narrating the events of their deployment. The film explores the challenges of reconciliation that these soldiers face: the reconciliation of Iraq and America, war and peace, the past and the present, the roles of soldier and civilian, and their two worlds governed by often contradictory values and rules. Through these parallel narratives A Normal Soldier offers a reflection on the Iraq war and America’s relationship with the war, its soldiers, and veterans.

Mo Scarpelli

Mo Scarpelli

Southern New Hampshire University Fellow

Mo Scarpelli, Southern New Hampshire University Fellow, will spend her New America fellowship directing and producing REFUGEE; a documentary transmedia project that unpacks the refugee experience in America, examines the social construction of the term ‘refugee,’ and examines the how and where refugees fit into the contemporary American social fabric. Scarpelli is a non-fiction filmmaker; she directed, shot and produced the feature-length documentary FRAME BY FRAME, about four Afghan photojournalists. Her work seeks to capture the innate poetry of human life, allowing observation to poke holes in prevailing myths of the world and air the complexities of human identity.

Mosi Secret

Mosi Secret

Eric & Wendy Schmidt Fellow

Mosi Secret, Eric & Wendy Schmidt Fellow, will write a book about a little known effort to desegregate elite boarding schools in the South beginning in the late 1960s. The desegregation project recruited and provided scholarships for black students to go to prep school, and quietly doubled as a social experiment, seeking to measure whether integration would decrease bigotry among elite whites. Secret is an independent journalist based in Brooklyn. Previously he was reporter for the New York Times, and before joining the Times, he was a reporter at the nonprofit investigative newsroom ProPublica. He got his start in journalism at alternative weekly newspapers. His work has won numerous local and national awards, and in 2015 he was a Knight-Wallace Journalism Fellow. He grew up in Atlanta and graduated from Harvard College.

Returning Fellows
hassan abbas

Hassan Abbas

Eric & Wendy Schmidt Fellow

Hassan Abbas is an Eric & Wendy Schmidt Fellow at New America. He will write a book about Islam's internal struggles and spirituality as observed during his travels to sacred Muslim sites and shrines in Saudi Arabia, Iran, Iraq, Syria, Jordan, Turkey, India, and Pakistan. He is currently a professor and department chair at National Defense University's College of International Security Affairs in Washington, D.C. He also served as Distinguished Quaid-i-Azam Professor at Columbia University. He remained a fellow at Harvard Law School, Belfer Centre at Harvard's Kennedy School & Asia Society. He earned an LLM from the University of Nottingham, United Kingdom as a Britannia Chevening Scholar and a MALD and PhD from the Fletcher School of Law & Diplomacy at Tufts University. His most recent book The Taliban Revival was published by Yale University Press in 2014.

Matthieu Aikins

Matthieu Aikins

Southern New Hampshire University Fellow

Matthieu Aikins is a Southern New Hampshire University Fellow at New America. He will work on a book about Afghan refugees. He is a freelance journalist who has written for Harper’sThe New Yorker, the New York Times MagazineRolling Stone, and other leading publications. He has received the Livingston Award for International Reporting, the George Polk award, and numerous other honors.

Marcia Chatelain

Marcia Chatelain

Eric & Wendy Schmidt Fellow

Marcia Chatelain is an Eric & Wendy Schmidt Fellow at New America. She will spend her fellowship year on a book that explores visions of economic and racial justice after 1968 and the fast food industry. An associate professor of history and African American studies at Georgetown University, she is the author of the book South Side Girls: Growing up in the Great Migration (Duke University Press, 2015). Chatelain has received funding from the Harry S. Truman Scholarship and the Ford Foundations, as well as several teaching awards. She received degrees in journalism and religious studies from the University of Missouri and holds an A.M. and Ph.D. in american civilization from Brown University.

Matt Davis

Matthew Davis

Eric & Wendy Schmidt Fellow

Matthew Davis is an Eric & Wendy Schmidt Fellow at New America. He will write a book about the Gallaudet University football team, the education of the deaf and hard-of-hearing, and the changing nature of deaf identity. He is currently the founding director of The Alan Cheuse International Writers Center at George Mason University. Previously, he has been a fellow at The Black Mountain Institute at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas and a Fulbright fellow to Syria and Jordan. He holds an MFA in nonfiction writing from the University of Iowa, an MA in international relations from The Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, and is the award-winning author of When Things Get Dark: A Mongolian Winters Tale.

Bartlow Elmore

Bartow Elmore

Eric & Wendy Schmidt Fellow

Bartow Elmore is an Eric & Wendy Schmidt Fellow at New America. An assistant professor of environmental history at The Ohio State University and a member of their Sustainable and Resilient Economy Discovery Group, he will work on his book Seed Money: How the Monsanto Company’s Quest for Power Remade Our World. It will offer the first global environmental history of the St. Louis firm, tracing Monsanto's astounding evolution from making DDT to manipulating DNA and use the firm to assess the future environmental sustainability of corporate capitalism.

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Virginia Eubanks

New America Fellow

Virginia Eubanks is a Class of 2016 & 2017 New America Fellow. Through her fellowship she pursued a three-year research study into digital privacy, economic inequality and data-based discrimination. Funded by the Digital Trust Foundation, this project engages a team of grassroots organizations—The Center for Community Transitions (Charlotte, North Carolina), Allied Media Projects (Detroit, Michigan), and Los Angeles Community Action Network/Stop LAPD Spying (Los Angeles, California)—to examine and address the collection, storage, and sharing of personal data in poor and working-class neighborhoods across the U.S. Eubanks writes for The NationThe American Prospect, and Equal Future and founded a social justice organization focused on technology and economic justice, the Popular Technology Workshops. She is the author of Digital Dead End: Fighting for Social Justice in the Information Age and co-editor of Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around: Forty Years of Movement Building with Barbara Smith.

Nikole Hannah Jones

Nikole Hannah-Jones

Emerson Fellow

Nikole Hannah-Jones is an Emerson fellow at New America. She will write a book about school segregation in the United States, to be published by One World/Random House. Hannah-Jones is a reporter at the New York Times Magazine. Prior to that, she was a reporter at the investigative reporting firm ProPublica and at newspapers in Oregon and North Carolina. Hannah-Jones's reporting earned the 2015 Peabody and Polk awards, the Sigma Delta Chi Award for public service, the Grand Prize for Distinguished Education Reporting, among others, and the 2017 National Magazine Award. She is a graduate of the University of Notre Dame and earned her master's from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's School of Media and Journalism.

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Robin Harris

Education Policy Fellow

Robin V. Harris, Ph.D. is a Class of 2016-2018 Education Policy Fellow at New America. She will write a book about the “godmother of school choice,” Annette “Polly” Williams, the Wisconsin state legislator who ignited a national movement by writing and sponsoring Milwaukee’s landmark school voucher program. Currently, Harris is the managing editor at The Education Trust, a national education advocacy and policy organization. Previously, she served as editorial director at Education Sector and associate editor of Diverse Issues in Higher Education, where she focused on issues facing students of color in K-12 and Higher Education. She is a graduate of Howard University and earned a master’s and doctorate in English literature from the University of Maryland, College Park.

Zaha Hassan

Zaha Hassan

Middle East Fellow

Zaha Hassan is a Middle East Fellows at New America. She will complete a novel, Die Standing Like Trees, which deals with a Palestinian-American woman’s search for answers twenty years after her mother’s violent death during the height of the Oslo peace talks. She is a human rights lawyer and former coordinator and senior legal advisor to the Palestinian negotiating team during Palestine’s bid for UN membership from 2010-2012. She received her J.D. from the University of California at Berkeley, an LLM in transnational & international law from Willamette University, and graduated magna cum laude from the University of Washington in Seattle with a B.A. in political science and Near East languages and civilizations. She has been cohost for the last two years of the Portland, Oregon radio show, One Land Many Voices, on KBOO 90.7 FM and is a contributor to the online magazine, The Civil Arab

Emily Cole Hunt

Emily Cole Hunt

International Security Program Fellow

Emily Cole Hunt is an Eric & Wendy Schmidt Fellow at New America. She will write a book about the law, history, and theory of domestic undercover operations, to be published by Metropolitan/Henry Holt.  Hunt previously practiced law in the New York office of Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom.  Prior to becoming a lawyer, Hunt worked in national security as the Soref Fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy and as a consultant to a London-based private military company.  Her work on terrorism and radicalization has been widely published and cited, and she has regularly provided commentary to national and international news media.  She received a B.A. from the University of St. Andrews in Scotland, a M.A. in war studies from King's College, London, and a J.D. from UCLA School of Law.

Mara Hvistendahl

Mara Hvistendahl

Eric & Wendy Schmidt Fellow

Mara Hvistendahl is a National Fellow at New America. She will write a book about the U.S.-China technological relationship, to be published by Riverhead. She is a contributing correspondent at Science and a founding member of the writers' cooperative Deca. Her first book, Unnatural Selection, a chronicle of the sex trafficking, instability, and other consequences that have resulted from prenatal sex selection around the world, was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. Her writing has appeared in The Atlantic, Harper’sThe New York Times, Popular Science, Scientific AmericanSlate, and The Wall Street Journal, among other publications.  For eight years, she covered science, politics, and other issues from China.

Jude Joffe Block 2

Jude Joffe-Block

New Arizona Fellow

Jude Joffe-Block is a New Arizona Fellow at New America. She will co-author a book and produce long-form audio stories about how Sheriff Joe Arpaio pioneered local immigration enforcement initiatives in Arizona's Maricopa County, and the class action racial profiling lawsuit Latino drivers brought to challenge those tactics. The book will be written with journalist Terry Greene Sterling. From 2010-2017 Joffe-Block was a senior field correspondent for the NPR station in Phoenix, where she covered immigration and politics for public radio stations in the Southwest and national NPR shows. She is a former Fulbright Scholar in Mexico and has degrees from Yale University and U.C. Berkeley's Graduate School of Journalism.

Theodore Johnson

Theodore Johnson

Eric & Wendy Schmidt Fellow

Theodore Johnson is an Eric & Wendy Schmidt Fellow at New America. He will write a book about black voting behavior in the post-Obama political landscape. He is currently a national security research manager and an adjunct professor at the Georgetown University McCourt School of Public Policy. Previously, Johnson was a commander in the United States Navy where he served in a variety of positions including as a White House fellow and speechwriter for the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. He has also written extensively on race, politics, and society for publications such as, The AtlanticThe Washington PostNational ReviewThe New Republic, and The Wall Street Journal. A native of North Carolina, he is a graduate of Hampton University and Harvard University, and holds a doctorate of law and policy from Northeastern University.

Azmat Khan

Azmat Khan

ASU Future of War Fellow

Azmat Khan is an ASU Future of War fellow at New America. She will investigate U.S. counterterrorism detention practices. Her reporting for the PBS series FRONTLINE, Al Jazeera, and BuzzFeed’s Investigative Unit has earned the 2016 Daniel Pearl Award for Outstanding Reporting on South Asia, the 2016 Deadline Club Award for Independent Digital Reporting, a 2016 Livingston Award nomination in International Reporting, a 2014 Emmy nomination in New Approaches to Documentary Film, and other honors. She received an MSt. from Oxford University, which she attended as a Clarendon scholar, a B.A. from the University of Michigan, and studied at the American University in Cairo.

Gideon Lewis-Kraus

Gideon Lewis-Kraus

New America Fellow

Gideon Lewis-Kraus is a New America fellow. He will work on a long-term reporting project on the present and future of machine learning, centered around the research teams at Google Brain and their experimental inquiries into the theory, design, and implementation of artificial neural networks. He is currently a Writer at Large for the New York Times Magazine, a Contributing Writer at Wired, and a Contributing Editor at Harper's, and writes regularly for a variety of other publications. He is the author of the book A Sense of Direction and the Kindle Single No Exit. He is a graduate of Stanford University and a former Fulbright Scholar. He will be a New America Fellow.

Souad Mekhennet

Souad Mekhennet

Eric & Wendy Schmidt Fellow

Souad Mekhennet is an Eric & Wendy Schmidt Fellow at New America. She is the author of I Was Told to Come Alone: My Journey Behind the Lines of Jihad, which Henry Holt will publish in 2017.  The book recounts her quest to discover what is in the minds of young jihadists, with an eye toward understanding what leads them to commit violent acts. She tells this story through her personal experiences as a Muslim born and raised in Germany and through her extensive reporting on jihadi terrorism, which she has covered since 2001 in Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa.  She has written extensively for publications on both sides of the Atlantic and is currently a correspondent for The Washington Post.

George Packer

George Packer

ASU Future of War Fellow

George Packer is an ASU Future of War Fellow at New America. He will write a book about Richard Holbrooke and American foreign policy. Packer has been a staff writer at The New Yorker since 2003. He is the author, most recently, of The Unwinding: An Inner History of the New America, a New York Times bestseller, which won the 2013 National Book Award for non-fiction. He has published four other works of non-fiction, including The Assassins’ Gate: America in Iraq; two novels; and a play, Betrayed, based on a New Yorker article, which ran five months Off Broadway in 2008 and won the Lucille Lortel Award for Outstanding Play. Packer has been a Guggenheim fellow and twice a fellow at the American Academy in Berlin; he is also a 2016-17 Cullman fellow at the New York Public Library.

Zia Haider Rahman

Zia Haider Rahman

Souther New Hampshire University Fellow

Zia Haider Rahman is a Southern New Hampshire University Fellow at New America.  He is working on a novel exploring the rise of the algorithm in shaping a person’s world and on a memoir. He is also developing a technology project to map the world’s elites. His first novel, In the Light of What We Know (FSG, 2014), was published to international critical acclaim and won the prestigious James Tait Black Prize, previous winners of which include Evelyn Waugh, Graham Greene, Nadine Gordimer, and Cormac McCarthy. 

Rahman is a Radcliffe Fellow at Harvard University, a Senior Fellow at the Kreisky Forum, Vienna, a 2018 Director’s Visitor at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, and a visiting professor in SNHU’s MFA in Fiction & Non-Fiction. 

Along with Adam Gopnik, John Gray, and others, Rahman is a contributor to BBC Radio 4’s “Point of View.” In his varied career, he has worked as an international human rights lawyer and anti-corruption activist, as a lawyer advising financial institutions on regulation, and, briefly, as a derivatives trader at Goldman Sachs. He was educated at Oxford, Cambridge, Munich, and Yale Universities.

Erin Snider

Erin Snider

Eric & Wendy Schmidt Fellow

Erin A. Snider is an Eric & Wendy Schmidt Fellow at New America. She will begin a new book project on the political economy of transition in the Arab world exploring the economic antecedents and consequences of the 2011 uprisings. She is currently an assistant professor of international affairs at Texas A&M University’s George H.W. Bush School of Government and Public Service, where her research focuses on the political economy of development in Arab world, particularly in Egypt. She is presently finishing a book manuscript on the political economy of U.S. democracy aid in the Middle East. Previously, she was a fellow in middle east political economy at Princeton University’s Niehaus Center for Globalization and Governance. She was a Gates Scholar at the University of Cambridge, where she earned her PhD, and a graduate of the University of London’s School of Oriental and African Studies and James Madison University.

Phil Sands

Phil Sands

Eric & Wendy Schmidt Fellow

Phil Sands is an Eric & Wendy Schmidt Fellow at New America. He is writing a book focused on a single murder committed in the opening months of the Syrian revolution, which exposes new details about the start of the revolt and the country’s descent into civil war. He has worked as a Middle East reporter for over a decade, and his writing has appeared in GQEsquireLe MondeThe Independent and The National, as well as specialist regional publications.  He was based in Damascus from 2007 through 2013 as The National’s Iraq and Syria correspondent. Phil is currently a correspondent for The National, specializing in in-depth stories on Syria’s southern front.

Tim Shenk

Timothy Shenk

New America National Fellow

Timothy Shenk is National Fellow at New America. He will write a book examining the surprisingly short history of the economy, a concept that began the twentieth century as an obscure notion of interest mostly to a small group of economists, but soon became the dominant subject of political debate across the globe. He attended Cambridge University on a Kellett Fellowship, received a doctorate in history from Columbia University, and is currently a Mellon postdoctoral fellow at Washington University in St. Louis. His first book, Maurice Dobb: Political Economist, was published by Palgrave Macmillan in 2013, and his work has appeared in a variety of outlets, including the Nation, the Chronicle of Higher Education, and Dissent, where he is also the associate book review editor.

Lauren Henry Scholz

Lauren Henry Scholz

Eric & Wendy Schmidt Fellow

Lauren Henry Scholz is an Eric & Wendy Schmidt Fellow at New America. She will write a book on the recent rise of privacy protective technologies and organizational strategies, and will discuss how this pro-privacy boom in corporate strategy can be entrenched and reinforced. She is currently a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard Law School's Project on the Foundations of Private Law. Previously,  she was a postdoctoral fellow at Yale Law School's Information Society Project. Her scholarly work on law and technology has or will appear in Iowa Law ReviewCardozo Law Review, and Stanford Technology Law Review. She is a graduate of Yale College, and has a J.D. from Harvard Law School.

Paul Wood

Paul Wood

Eric & Wendy Schmidt Fellow

Paul Wood is an Eric & Wendy Schmidt Fellow at New America. He will write a book about Syria’s unending war, having spent four years covering the conflict for the BBC. The book will be a record of the people he met in the uprising, most now dead. He was smuggled over the border into Syria many times to report on the country’s rebel movement. His stories have won two Emmys, a Peabody, and he was twice awarded the US Radio and TV Correspondents’ Association David Bloom award for foreign reporting. He was also the UK Foreign Press Association’s journalist of the year. Wood has covered a dozen conflicts in a 20 year career as a BBC foreign correspondent: in Afghanistan, Iraq, Chechnya, Darfur, Libya, Israel and the Palestinian territories, the Balkans, and Ukraine.