In Poverty, No Privacy?

Most Americans consider the right to privacy a right of citizenship, but for families within the public benefits system, ceding extensive personal and financial information and submitting to unannounced home visits, fingerprinting or drug testing are the cost of receiving assistance. In this podcast, Brigid Schulte, with the Breadwinners and Caregivers Program, Aleta Sprague, with the Asset Building Program, Michele Gilman, with the University of Baltimore, and Virginia Eubanks, with SUNY Albany, sit down with Rachel Black, with the Asset Building Program, to consider what it means to have different standards of privacy based on financial status, how it came to be this way, and how technology has changed the landscape of risks and protections.

Contributors:

Aleta Sprague is a program fellow with the Family-Centered Social Policy program at New America.

Brigid Schulte is the director of the Better Life Lab at New America. Schulte is an award-winning journalist and author, who writes widely for publications including the Washington Post, Slate, Time,  the Guardian, and others. Her book on time pressure, gender roles and modern life, Overwhelmed, Work, Love and Play when No One has the Time, was a New York Times bestseller.

Rachel Black is the co-director of the Family-Centered Social Policy program at New America. In this role, she leads research, analysis, and public commentary around a portfolio of issues devoted to creating a more equitable public policy approach to  advancing a new vision for social policy that allows all families to thrive in an era of growing risk, uncertainty, and inequality.

Virginia Eubanks is a Class of 2016 & 2017 New America Fellow, who pursued a three-year research study into digital privacy, economic inequality and data-based discrimination.