<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="https://newamericadotorg-static.s3.amazonaws.com/static/css/newamericadotorg.min.css"></link>

In Poverty, No Privacy?

Most Americans consider the right to privacy a right of citizenship, but for families within the public benefits system, ceding extensive personal and financial information and submitting to unannounced home visits, fingerprinting or drug testing are the cost of receiving assistance. In this podcast, Brigid Schulte, with the Breadwinners and Caregivers Program, Aleta Sprague, with the Asset Building Program, Michele Gilman, with the University of Baltimore, and Virginia Eubanks, with SUNY Albany, sit down with Rachel Black, with the Asset Building Program, to consider what it means to have different standards of privacy based on financial status, how it came to be this way, and how technology has changed the landscape of risks and protections.