Brent Parton

Deputy Director, Center on Education and Skills

Brent Parton is the deputy director of the Center on Education and Skills with the Education Policy program at New America. The Center is dedicated to building learning-based pathways to economic opportunity that can begin inside or outside of formal higher education. His work focuses on federal and state policies to scale those pathways, and ensure their quality and relevance within an evolving economy. Prior to New America, Parton served as a senior policy advisor at the U.S. Department of Labor. There he advised leadership on a range of skills issues including the expansion of apprenticeship, the design of investments in regional industry-workforce partnerships, and enhancing federal interagency coordination on skills initiatives.

Before joining the Department, Parton worked at the National Governors Association where he led the development of a new portfolio focused on supporting state strategies to expand high-quality work based learning, and provided technical assistance to state leaders to align workforce, post-secondary education, and economic development policy and strategy. Parton also worked in the education sector of the World Bank, co-authoring a book on entrepreneurship education and training, and supporting policy dialogue related to skills and youth employment. Before that he led a start-up non-profit organization focused on engaging youth in health care policy, and taught English in Shenzhen, China. Parton has a bachelor’s degree in history and a master’s degree in international education policy, both from Vanderbilt University, where he is also an adjunct professor.

All Work

EDUCATION POLICY
Four Things for Trump's New Apprenticeship Task Force to Consider First

The Task Force can continue work towards a full-fledged American apprenticeship system. It shouldn't forget what makes apprenticeship great.


EDUCATION POLICY
Apprenticeships, Long Common in Blue-collar Industries, Are Coming to White-collar Office Work

Brent Parton was quoted in the Washington Post on apprenticeship's transition into white-collar settings.


EDUCATION POLICY
Putting Equity at the Center of Youth Apprenticeship

Youth apprenticeship can be a pathway to prosperity for millions of Americans, but not if equity considerations come as an afterthought.


EDUCATION POLICY
Assessing Industry's Power in Education

New Education-Employment Linkage Index looks at how industry and education share power in the world's top education systems


EDUCATION POLICY
In one state, students are ditching classrooms for jobs

Brent Parton was quoted in the Hechinger Report about an increasing interest for work-based learning among Vermont high school students.


EDUCATION POLICY
First Thoughts on Trump's Apprenticeship Order

President Trump's Executive Order on apprenticeship is still short on details, but risks sowing confusion in an already fragmented field.


EDUCATION POLICY
Trump's Apprenticeship Plans Taking Shape

Trump's workforce week will tell us more about his CTE and workforce plans, and how likely they are to succeed.


EDUCATION POLICY
Skills Takeaways from the Trump Budget Request

Deep cuts to the workforce system proposed in the 2018 budget request will hurt American workers - perhaps Trump voters worst of all.


EDUCATION POLICY
Congress Continues Apprenticeship Momentum

Congress looks to continue new funding to states and intermediaries to make it easier for employers to get in the apprenticeship game.


EDUCATION POLICY
How Trump Can Solve the Shortage of High-Tech Workers

Brent Parton wrote for Politico about how H-1B reform should present apprenticeship as an alternative to filling entry-level tech jobs.


EDUCATION POLICY
A First Glimpse of the Trump Administration's Workforce Vision

Some jobs won't come back. To make sure Americans are ready for new ones, employers can no longer be passive consumers of talent.


EDUCATION POLICY
Can We Get to 5 Million “Apprenticeships” in 5 Years?

The difference between apprenticeship and registered apprenticeship and why it matters.