Will America ever have a woman president?

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Media Outlet: Politico

Marcia Chatelain wrote a piece for Politico Magazine on the prospect of a woman president:

Most people who follow politics spent 2016 imagining an America where Mr. President became Madam President. But the reality today looks very different. The highest glass ceiling remains firmly in place, and President Donald Trump’s theatrically alpha-male leadership style has made a crack seem even more remote. Plenty of women are floated as possible Democratic nominees in 2020, but none with as clear a shot as Hillary Clinton had; after her loss, some Democrats are even wondering whether they should run a man to give the party a better chance in the next cycle. On the Republican side, assuming Trump seeks reelection, a woman would not get the opportunity to run until at least 2024.
Will America ever elect a woman president? And what will it take?
We asked women (yes, all women) from a range of fields for their insights into why it hasn’t happened—plus when, and how, that could change. Their answers drilled into the structure of American politics, the power of family dynamics in our decisions, the shifting preferences of voters and the pipeline of women candidates themselves. And if partisan competition is the only certainty in American politics today, champions of women’s leadership have this to hold onto: Democrats and Republicans each claimed their party would get the first woman into the White House.

Author:

Marcia Chatelain is an Eric & Wendy Schmidt Fellow at New America. An associate professor of history and African American studies at Georgetown University, she is the author of the book South Side Girls: Growing up in the Great Migration (Duke University Press, 2015).