The Workweek: Jan. 27, 2017

The Workweek picks this week include an article from the Economist that explores continuous education as the answer to technological change. Another article in the Economist finds that despite promises, politicians are not able to bring back well-paid manufacturing jobs because these jobs no longer exist. Similarly, the Upshot discusses how much influence a president has over an economy. And in the Wall Street Journal, Indeed Chief Economist Jed Kolko dives into Census Bureau data to dissect occupation, educational and geographical background of US immigrants who arrive in recent years.

Most interesting nugget? A new study in the Wall Street Journal argues that only a tiny fraction of all occupations can be fully replaced by automation. But in the next forty or so years technology could take over 50% of the tasks carried out by workers today. And in order to fully reap the benefits in terms of enhanced productivity and economic growth, workers across all industries need to be prepared to think creatively so that technologies can augment, rather than replace, their skills.

The Workweek is a weekly roundup written mostly by’s Jed Kolko that highlights the latest research, news, and perspectives around the labor market. In addition to working with Indeed, Jed also pulled together all the research and data for the Shift Commission.


Kristin Sharp directs New America's Initiative on Work, Workers, and Technology. In 2016, she co-founded and ran Shift: The Commission on Work, Workers, and Technology, a joint project of New America and Bloomberg.