LockMart Comes Clean

Photo: Paul Hudson/ Flickr

Defense giant Lockheed Martin has been rummaging around in the clean energy business for some time. Just before the 2008 election of Barack Obama, they established a clean energy showroom in their Crystal City, VA offices, which featured such technologies as microgrids and bioenergy. Quoted in this Bloomberg article, "Turbines from Outer Space Lift Lockheed into New Energy Future," a Lockheed official said that the company is now looking at  "clean energy" (not just renewable energy, as they are developing batteries, control technologies, and nuclear, as well) as part of its diversification strategy, now that the U.S. defense market is less robust than in the go-go years of the Iraq and Afghanistan buildup. The article profiles a tidal energy project in Scotland, which uses turbines repurposed from the space shuttle program. Atlantis, the Singaporean company partnered with Lockheed for the project, claims the turbines could generate up to 1,600 megawatts -- which would be enough energy to power about 1.2 million homes. And while the clean energy petting zoo in Crystal City was nice to visit, steel in the water in Scotland will make a more convincing case that Lockheed has arrived as a global provider of energy technology. 

Author:

Sharon E. Burke is a senior advisor at New America, where she focuses on international security and a new program, Resource Security, which examines the intersection of security, prosperity, and natural resources.