Serving up technology in the public’s interest—hard, but worth it

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Photo: Mike Boening, Flickr
Media Outlet: Mashable

Dipayan Ghosh wrote for Mashable about his experience in tech companies and public interest organizations: 

Tech companies can be great places to work.
You’re often exposed to what can seem like an idyllic professional life: brilliant, ambitious, yet down-to-earth colleagues from all corners of the globe; aggressive corporate growth objectives that present an intellectual challenge; pristine offices that can sometimes feel like you’re in a spaceship; perks that can include free transit to and from work, frequent catering and personal visits from world-famous chefs, and my personal favorite, a top-notch gaming center.
And, all of that often comes with a decent salary and maybe even stock options to boot.
But for some engineers and technologists that have served in the industry, there’s often a deep-lying, repressed interest: a desire to do something that’s more directly in the public’s interest.


Dipayan Ghosh is a fellow across New America’s Public Interest Technology initiative and the Open Technology Institute, where he focuses on advancing consumer-oriented public policy initiatives at the intersection of privacy, security, and civil rights.