AI is the future of hiring, but it's far from immune to bias

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Photo: Henry Gale, Flickr
Media Outlet: Quartz

Dipayan Ghosh wrote for Quartz about the implications of using AI in hiring processes: 

I recently had coffee with a young professional who wanted advice about how to get a job in policy. Every morning, for months, he had been monitoring Capitol Hill’s version of the classified ad board for job opportunities, the Congressional placement office’s jobs bulletins. He had submitted dozens of applications, applying to jobs where he thought his skills closely matched or surpassed the requisite qualifications, only to receive no reply. “At times, I felt so frustrated that I wanted to give up the search altogether,” he told me.
Over the past few years, I have been studying the broader impact of algorithms on society, first as an academic in computer science, and later in my work as an advisor to the Obama White House. In considering my mentee’s situation, I could not help but think that there should have been a way to use modern technology to connect him with the opportunities he wanted.
Enter, artificial intelligence.

Author:

Dipayan Ghosh is a fellow across New America’s Public Interest Technology initiative and the Open Technology Institute, where he focuses on advancing consumer-oriented public policy initiatives at the intersection of privacy, security, and civil rights.