Robyn Greene

Policy Counsel and Government Affairs Lead, Open Technology Institute

Robyn Greene is the policy counsel and government affairs lead for the Open Technology Institute at New America specializing in issues concerning surveillance and cybersecurity.  She helps to research and develop policies to protect individuals' privacy, secure the internet, and fuel the development of and access to emerging technologies.  

Prior to joining the Open Technology Institute, Greene worked at the American Civil Liberties Union's Washington Legislative Office, where she focused on legislation and administration policies concerning surveillance, cybersecurity, government secrecy, and federal law enforcement oversight.  Before working at the ACLU, Greene ran issue based grassroots advocacy campaigns with Grassroots Campaigns, on behalf of non-profit organizations including Amnesty International and the ACLU.  

Greene earned a B.A. in government and politics at the University of Maryland, and a J.D. from Hofstra University School of Law. 

All Work

OPEN TECHNOLOGY INSTITUTE
Surveillance Costs: The NSA's Impact on the Economy, Internet Freedom & Cybersecurity

The NSA's impact reaches far beyond security, also affecting the U.S. economy, American foreign policy and internet security as a whole.


OPEN TECHNOLOGY INSTITUTE
The CISPA-Zombie Won’t Die

Despite over a year of major disclosures about how the NSA violates Americans’ privacy and engages in cyber operations that make the Interne


OPEN TECHNOLOGY INSTITUTE
OTI Analysis of Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act (CISA, S. 2588)

The following is the introduction to the Open Technology Institute's analysis of the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act of 2014 (CISA, S.


OPEN TECHNOLOGY INSTITUTE
Info Sharing with NSA is a Non-Starter – and Only One of the New Cybersecurity Bill’s Many Problems

OPEN TECHNOLOGY INSTITUTE
The Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act of 2014: A Major Step Back on Privacy

OPEN TECHNOLOGY INSTITUTE
The Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act of 2014: A Major Step Back in Privacy