Christopher Mellon

Program Associate, Future of Property Rights Initiative

Christopher Mellon is a program associate with the Future of Property Rights Initiative at New America. Previously, he was a researcher with New America's International Security program, where his work focused on the maintenance and analysis of New America's hostage dataset. Prior to New America, Mellon worked as an IT contractor for the Office of the Secretary of Defense. He graduated from St. John’s College in 2014 with a bachelor's degree in liberal arts.

All Work

INTERNATIONAL SECURITY
A Mobile Application to Secure Land Tenure

Data collection apps make cheap, crowdsourced data collection more feasible than ever—but how does that translate to developing countries?


INTERNATIONAL SECURITY
Prerequisites for Incorporating Blockchain into a Registry

Growing interest in using the blockchain to secure a land registry merits a deeper discussion of the concept.


INTERNATIONAL SECURITY
Qatar Crisis Raises Questions About Defining Terrorism

Christopher Mellon was quoted in the Associated Press about Qatar, and the article cited his paper, To Pay Ransom or Not to Pay Ransom.


INTERNATIONAL SECURITY
The Price of Precision: How Autonomous Vehicles Will Drive Down the Cost of Dual-Frequency Satellite Receivers

Investment in autonomous vehicles will reduce the cost of dual-frequency GNSS receivers by a factor of ten within the next five years.


INTERNATIONAL SECURITY
Peering into the Future: How Dual-Frequency Satellite Receivers Will Democratize Land Surveying

Delineating one person’s property from another’s is a serious technical challenge and a prerequisite for granting secure legal titles.


INTERNATIONAL SECURITY
World of Drones

Examining the proliferation, development, and use of armed drones.


INTERNATIONAL SECURITY
Stephen Miller’s Kitchen Sink Approach to Justifying the Travel Ban

INTERNATIONAL SECURITY
Trump's Travel Ban Would Not Have Prevented a Single Death From Jihadist Terror

INTERNATIONAL SECURITY
To Pay Ransom or Not to Pay Ransom?

American hostages are more likely to remain in captivity or die than other Western hostages.