What We See When We Look at Travel Photography

Read Original Article
Media Outlet: New York Times

Gideon Lewis-Kraus wrote an essay for the New York Times about travel and photography: 

There is a vast gulf between how people tend to think of “tourism,” an agreeable pursuit for themselves and a great benefit to their local economy, and how people tend to think of other tourists, as interlopers, beholden to oafish appetites for packaged experience. Those of us who travel professionally, with a view to record for those at home our encounters on the road, try to bridge that perceptual divide. This can be uncomfortable. Tourists in bad faith, we are paid to elevate our naïve consumption (of city, museum, vista, ruin, breakfast) to the level of a vocation. The internal anxiety that this contradiction inspires in us often gets displaced, in an amusing way, onto others on the same circuit. Professional travelers like nothing better than the opportunity to point out the crumminess of other professional travelers.

Author:

Gideon Lewis-Kraus is a New America fellow. He is a writer at large for the New York Times Magazine, a contributing writer at Wired, and a contributing editor at Harper's, and writes regularly for a variety of other publications.