Rising Popularity of Dual-Language Education Could Leave Latinos Behind

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Media Outlet: Hechinger Report

Conor P. Williams was quoted in Hechinger Report about how English-dominant families' interest in multilingual schools could be preventing Spanish-speaking students from getting access to these programs. The piece was syndicated in US News.

But even though the Houston Elementary program is celebrated for offering dual-language education to a group of students that has historically been shut out of the equation, research indicates they won't get as much value from the program as Spanish-speaking children from immigrant families would, or as any of the students at Oyster-Adams do.
At Houston Elementary, the only native Spanish speakers that students hear are their teachers. At Oyster-Adams, on the other hand, where administrators have always maintained a 50-50 split in the language backgrounds of students, children develop a social vocabulary in addition to an academic one by talking to their friends.
"It helps build a more robust use of the language," says Conor Williams, founding director of the Dual Language Learners National Work Group at New America.


In the News:

Conor P. Williams is a senior researcher in New America's Education Policy Program. His work addresses policies and practices related to educational equity, dual language learners, immigration, and school choice.