The Post-ownership Society

Five and a half years ago, when I first moved to Washington, D.C., for a magazine job, I rented a basement apartment in a neighborhood called Bloomingdale. The area was full of Victorian-era homes that had once been occupied by mostly middle-class black families, right on the border where the Northwest quadrant of the city becomes the Northeast. But throughout the 2000s, affordable D.C. neighborhoods with trendy-sounding names like Bloomingdale drew gentrifiers who needed low rents—journalists, creative types, entry-level do-gooders, and shift-working bartenders and baristas who occasionally had Mom and Dad’s help—and so the neighborhoods changed.

Read the full article, originally published in the Washington Monthly, here.  

Author:

Monica Potts was a Class of 2016 & 2017 New America Fellow, writing a book about the dilemmas facing poor women and explore the idea of a second-chance society. Previously, Potts spent four years at the American Prospect magazine.